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Julian is featured in the latest issue of Dear Boy Magazine, and was asked 20 questions on his life and taking pride in guilty pleasures. Check out some scans and outtakes in our gallery! Sorry for the delay on this. Happy Holidays to all.

What are you doing these days?
Just finished filming Little Women for the BBC and PBS over in the States. I play John Brooke in the new adaption of the classic book.

How did you get started on your acting career?
I got into drama class and got this lucky break where I was able to play the young roles for The Shakespeare Company. It just so happened that during my gap year I got lucky and the rest just unfolded. I’m incredibly grateful that I get to do something now that I love so much.

Favourite show?
Breaking Bad

Tell us a typical day of being an actor on set?
Morning, wake up – generally early. Once I get to set, I like to get into my costume first in my trailer, then you get to the make up truck where they do your makeup and fix your hair for the character. Then you might talk to the director about what you’re about to do that day and think about it and the rest unfolds. Each production is different, but you just get in and tackle the scene and try and find those moments.

Do you have a guilty pleasure? Something so bad that it is good?
[laughs] Where do we begin? I have to say that I have lots of pleasures and I take pride in them and I don’t feel bad about them. [laughs]

What advice would you give to someone just starting out their career?
To someone starting out, I’d say: Work hard, play hard, be kind.

What is one bad habit that you can’t seem to get rid of?
I’m a terrible procrastinator. It’s terrible. Only because I really enjoy taking it slow. My favourite day of the week is Sunday, and it’s because I love Sunday mornings. I can’t treat too many days like my Sunday mornings.

What do you do on a Sunday morning?
Oh it’s my favourite day. I like to take my time with it. It’s the one day of the week I actually get a physical newspaper so preferably I’m reading a newspaper in bed with toast, marmalade and coffee.

Read the rest of this entry »




Julian attended the premiere of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House yesterday in California. Check out some photos in our gallery!




Julian attended the premiere of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House in New York last September 21st. The film will be out in theaters on September 29th. Check out high-quality photos of Julian at the premiere in our gallery!




So what initially made you want to get into acting?
I think I’ve always liked telling stories.

And career highlight so far?
Man in an Orange Shirt is certainly one: the experience of making it was wonderful, its themes are timely and powerful, and the film as a whole is one I’m hugely proud of making.

You’ve been cast in a lot of ‘darker’ roles – why do you think this is?
If by darker you mean more complicated, then certainly – I’m naturally drawn towards those characters and their profundities. The challenge of understanding a role, and revealing who that person is, excites me.

Are you ever apprehensive about the characters you play? Victor in [Kieran Evans’ 2014 picture]
Kelly + Victor for example, must have been pretty hardcore?
Any fears I had about what I anticipated would be a graphic and intense shoot were immediately dissolved by Kieran Evans. He is a singularly talented filmmaker, and I felt safe in his hands. I knew that what he would make would be provocative, moving and special. I felt it was so right that he was awarded a BAFTA for his work.

How do you gear yourself up for a day of shooting?
By preparation. I prepare enough so that I’m released from the words, and the emotion is as genuine as it can possibly be.

And for something like The Silent Man, where there is a certain level of history involved, what’s the prep like?
Again, as much as possible. The historical context was vital of course, but more than anything I wanted to understand what it would have been like for Bob Woodward – a young man at the time – to go after a person of such power, and what qualities he would have needed in order to do so.

What was it like to work with Liam Neeson?
Oh amazing. Every second of it. He’s an exceptional actor and is incredible in the film. He’s got a forceful quality, and yet remains vulnerable; the look of both the hunted and the hunter. Outside of work, he’s friendly and very funny.

So what’s the most difficult role you’ve played?
With Adam in Man in an Orange Shirt I felt a responsibility to the character like I don’t often feel. I knew his story would be close to so many gay men and women who have felt shame in their lives that to tell it truthfully was very important to me.

Do you like to get involved on projects that explore a deeper topic and theme (such asMan In An Orange Shirt)?
Always! Ideally you want something that can entertain meaningfully. Such are the films that linger in our memories and move us the most

Read the entire interview in the Wonderland Magazine website.




So 2017 is going to be a big year for you. You’ve got a film coming out, and you’ve got Man in An Orange Shirt with on the BBC. Tell me about that.
I’m really excited about it. It was the first opportunity I had for filming in London — the city I grew up in, so that in itself was incredibly exciting. And it was with Vanessa Redgrave, who was phenomenal, and she was every bit as challenging and exciting and wonderful as I hoped that she would be. And then you have this material — this searing, strong, deeply moving material — that looks at the life of a gay man and, I think, at probably what’s true for many gay men and minorities, where you may be in a society that is welcoming of you, supposedly, but the shame that you grew up with becomes its own form of oppression. And I think that’s the worst kind of oppression, when it’s self-imposed oppression.

How difficult is it to play a role like that?
It was very difficult. It was probably the most difficult role I’ve played in terms of where the character goes, what happens to him. You know, there was a kind of rape scene of sorts, which was obviously very difficult to film… And surprisingly difficult, I didn’t think it was going to be that difficult. I thought I’d be able to handle it fine, but it did affect me… in quite a profound way. Shooting it, and certainly afterwards. But at the same time, the themes that were explored I believe are vital, and in that sense it was wonderful knowing that I was doing something that had higher aspirations other than just simply to entertain. It is entertaining — it’s a beautiful love story at its heart and its core — but it’s also an eye-opener. It certainly was for me, reading the script. I got to think about things that I perhaps hadn’t thought about. And I think when people see it they’ll enjoy the love story, they’ll enjoy watching it, but they’ll also get to think of things that they perhaps haven’t. In that sense it’s really important, and I think it will be really really special.

So you grew up in North London, but you’re filming in L.A. all the time. What are the differences between filming with the BBC and filming in Hollywood?
[Laughs] The craft service! So on bigger-budget American stuff… it’s my favourite thing about being an actor, you get the crafty table, which is like a table of snacks. Or in L.A.’s case, it’s a room or a whole trailer. And it’s like munchie heaven [laughs]. So you’ll just go in, and anything you could possibly want, like popcorn, or little hotdogs, or sweets. And I have a huge sweet tooth, and I love to snack. So it’s like my dream… Whatever anyone ever tells you about acting, the best thing about it is the craft service!

So the BBC don’t spoil you like Hollywood?
The BBC spoils you in other ways. That said, I didn’t really have a lot of time to sort of go and get snacks.

You mentioned that the part you just played for the BBC was really challenging. I’m sure being an actor has huge ups and downs, so how do you reflect on your career’s trajectory so far? Has it been an upward curve?
I think what I’ve tried to do in the past few years is make careful choices, and so choosing the projects that I take on, I do with consideration to whether it will be an enjoyable experience, a challenging one, an artistic one… and also making the choice not to do something. The best thing you can do in terms of your career as an actor is to say ‘no’.

And that’s got to be difficult.
It is and it isn’t. It’s more difficult when you have the good fortune of being offered more than one thing at the same time. And they may be two or three great projects, great directors, and you have to say ‘no’ to two of them. That’s when it becomes difficult. However, I’m very clear on what I want to do, in terms of the challenges that I want to take on. I want to be scared by a role, by a project. And I’m director driven. So ultimately, it’s always the director. It’s my favourite part. It’s the relationship and the dialogue with a director which makes the character.

Read the full interview on the 1883 Magazine website!




We saw the return of Wren in the latest episode of Pretty Little Liars, which was directed by Troian Bellisario. I have added 2 behind-the-scenes images, additional high-quality stills, and high-resolution screencaps into the gallery!




The first batch of first look photos from the second season of Hand of God has been released. Check out the one featuring Julian as Reverend Paul Curtis in full HQ in our gallery!