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YouTube has picked up Vulture Club, from director Maryam Keshavarz and starring Susan Sarandon, Edie Falco and Matt Bomer.

The terrorist thriller will have a theatrical release later this year, before bowing on YouTube Red, the Google-owned streamer’s $10-per-month subscription service. Vulture Club, produced by Anna Gerb, Neal Dodson and J.C. Chandor, portrays a veteran emergency room nurse (Sarandon) secretly struggling to free her grown son, a journalist, from capture by a terrorist group.

After running into roadblocks with government agencies, she discovers a clandestine community of journalists and advocates who might be able to help her. Keshavarz (Circumstance) co-wrote Vulture Club with Jonathan Mastro.

“Maryam Keshavarz lends her powerful perspective as an Iranian-American filmmaker, and Susan Sarandon’s moving performance immediately drew us into this compelling film,” Susanne Daniels, global head of original content at YouTube, said in a statement.

Julian Morris, Lola Kirke and Sheila Vand round out the ensemble cast for Vulture Club. Keshavarz is repped by ICM Partners, Sarandon is repped by UTA, Falco is repped by ICM Partners and Management 360 and Bomer is repped by CAA and Anonymous Content.




Here’s the 30-second first trailer for the TV adaptation of the classic novel, Little Women. The three-part miniseries will air on BBC One on three consecutive nights starting on December 26th at 8pm. Next year, it will premiere on Masterpiece on PBS on Mother’s Day, May 13, 2018. Julian stars as John Brooke, Laurie Laurence’s earnest and intelligent tutor.




Julian attended the premiere of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House yesterday in California. Check out some photos in our gallery!




Julian attended the premiere of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House in New York last September 21st. The film will be out in theaters on September 29th. Check out high-quality photos of Julian at the premiere in our gallery!




Check out the first official trailer of Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, which stars Liam Neeson and Michael C. Hall. Julian also stars as Woodward, and he appears twice in the trailer. The film is set to premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival next month, and will be released in theaters on September 29th.

Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House centers on “Deep Throat”, the pseudonym given to the notorious whistleblower for one of the greatest scandals of all time, Watergate. The true identity of the secret informant remained a mystery and source of much public curiosity and speculation for more than 30 years. That is until, in 2005, special agent Mark Felt shockingly revealed himself as the tipster. This unbelievable true story chronicles the personal and professional life of the brilliant and uncompromising Felt, who risked and ultimately sacrificed everything – his family, his career, his freedom – in the name of justice.




New project alert! Julian is part of the the three-part miniseries adaptation of Little Women for BBC One and PBS. He will play as John Brooke, Laurie Laurence’s (Jonah Hauer-King) earnest and intelligent tutor. Filming has already begun last month in Ireland.

Lionsgate has come on board to handle worldwide distribution outside the U.S. and UK on BBC One and Playground Entertainment’s Little Womenadaptation that’s co-produced with Masterpiece on PBS. The three-part mini has also added cast including Dylan Baker, Julian Morris and Mark Stanley.

They join the previously set Angela Lansbury, Emily Watson and Michael Gambon as well as the four young actresses playing the March sisters, Maya Hawke, Willa Fitzgerald, Annes Elwy and Kathryn Newton.

The coming-of-age story based on Louisa May Alcott’s classic is set against the backdrop of the Civil War, and follows the four sisters on their journey from childhood to adulthood. With the help of their mother Marmee, while their father is away at war, the girls navigate what it means to be a young woman.

Source: Deadline




Check out this wonderful interview of iNews with Julian regarding Man in an Orange Shirt.

I was attracted to this project because it’s a breathtaking love story.
It’s transgressive in its honesty. My character, Adam, is complex. He’s really close to his grandmother and suffers from the shame that she makes him feel as a gay man. That shame causes him to repel any intimacy, and he seeks to punish himself through the sex that he has. It’s anonymous, hungry, often violent. And in banishing what is most beautiful about him – his need to love and be loved – he becomes his own oppressor.

Society has progressed with respect to civil rights, but the residue of past prejudice continues to infect us.
Feeling one has to reject one’s own identity must be one of the most damaging forms of oppression, and I think it’s the experience of many gay women and men today and indeed minorities across our society.

The show is really bold.
And I have to say, I’m proud of the BBC for taking it on in such an honest way. And not just that but also having a whole month of Gay Britannia.

It’s taken time for our society to get to this point.
Whether it’s the gay experience or people of colour, there’s always catch-up to be had. The really wonderful thing, though, is that it’s happening, across the board [in the arts]. You have Man in an Orange Shirt, you have Moonlight. You have Get Out and Wonder Woman. Things are happening.

Shooting a sex scene is exactly the same as shooting any other scene.
You’re trying to reveal something of the character, you’re moving the story in some manner, and your objective is to make clear to the audience what you’re trying to reveal.

The most violent scene in the show (when Adam is cruising for sex) shouldn’t be easy to watch.
I wanted it to be violent so I told the other actor, just really go for it, hit me if you want to. That was physically hard and the following day I definitely felt a little traumatised. But I’m proud of the scene.

I wanted to show the love story, too.
I wanted to take a long moment before Adam goes for his first kiss with Steve, because it was the first time it wasn’t just a physical thing. He was allowing himself to have a deeper experience, more intimate; it’s a crucial moment in his awakening.

I’m not worried about there being a backlash over the sex scenes.
I’m hoping that on one level people are entertained by it because I think it’s a really moving, vital and entertaining story. And I think and hope on a deeper level they will be able to connect and understand the anguish that these characters experience.

Now is a really exciting time to be an actor.
There’s such wonderful work being made. We’re in this platinum age of television – although the definition between television and cinema is totally blurred. Now it’s all about great film-making; we seek great character-driven drama on the small screen just as much as we do now when we go to the cinema. As an actor, it’s about finding characters who interest and excite you. And working with Vanessa Redgrave [in Man in an Orange Shirt] was obviously phenomenal.

I grew up in Crouch End in north London, but now I live in LA.
I’ll tell you, the London accent does go down well in the States.

I do miss some things about the UK.
I miss the people, the humour, the architecture. I feel very much a Londoner, although also very much a European, and I feel very British.

I was devastated by the vote for Brexit.
Although I understood it. We’re coming out of this great recession and so many have been left behind. We had the promise of globalisation, which should create wealth for all, but when it’s concentrated to just a few and not distributed in a way that is fair, no wonder people are upset. I think that’s been a failure on the right but I also think there have been failings on the left, in terms of not being forthright about the values that make Britain great.

Since being in the US, I have recognised how lucky we are to have the BBC.
You have politicians in the States who criticise and try to take down pillars of democracy and culture – whether it’s the free press or something else, or try to manipulate the media. It’s the same when I come back to Britain and I hear people trying to defund the BBC. That is an attack on our culture, on something which sustains us and allows for a show such as Man in an Orange Shirt to be on air. For the most part I think the BBC is an amazing, wonderful thing. It’s for us, by us and belongs to us, and we mustn’t let anyone take that away.